A forum of Catholic Thought

Getting out of the Sacristy: A Look at Our Pastoral PrioritiesBishop Robert Barron

For the past several days, I've been with my Word on Fire team, filming for the Flannery O'Connor and Fulton Sheen episodes of our "Pivotal Players" series. Our journey has taken us from Chicago to New ...

What "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom" Gets Right and Wrong Bishop Robert Barron

The original Jurassic Park film from twenty-five years ago rather inventively explored a theme that has been prominent in Western culture from the time of the Romantic reaction to the Enlightenment--namely, ...

The Question Behind the QuestionBishop Robert Barron

On the afternoon of June 14, a rather spirited, fascinating, and unexpected debate broke out on the floor of the USCCB spring meeting in Ft. Lauderdale. At issue was the possibility of reconsidering "Faithful ...

Sowing the Wind and Reaping the Whirlwind: A Reflection on the Irish Referendum Bishop Robert Barron

I will confess that as a person of Irish heritage on both sides of my family, I found the events in Ireland last week particularly dispiriting. Not only did the nation vote, by a two-to-one margin, for ...

Michelle Wolf and the Throwaway CultureBishop Robert Barron

The other night at the White House Correspondents' Dinner, Michelle Wolf, who I'm told is a comedian, regaled the black-tie and sequin-gowned crowd with her "jokes." Almost all were in extremely bad taste ...

The Most Unexpectedly Religious Film of the Year Bishop Robert Barron

I went to see A Quiet Place, John Krasinski's new thriller, with absolutely no anticipation of finding theological or spiritual themes. I just wanted a fun evening at the movies. How wonderful when a ...

Paul Tillich and "The Shape of Water"Bishop Robert Barron

I knew that The Shape of Water would win the Academy Award for Best Picture. It checked three of the major Hollywood boxes: celebration of oppressed people, valorization of complete sexual freedom, and ...

A Case for Priestly Celibacy Bishop Robert Barron

There is a very bad argument for celibacy which has reared its head throughout the tradition and which is, even today, defended by some. It runs something like this: married life is morally and spiritually ...