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Relic of St. Teresa venerated at cathedral on World Mission Sunday


  • The flag of Uganda is carried in procession at the start of the Mass for World Mission Sunday at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross Oct. 23. Pilot photo/Mark Labbe
  • Maureen Heil, Director of Programs and Development of the archdiocesan Pontifical Mission Societies, hold up a large World Mission Rosary during the Mass. (Pilot photo/Mark Labbe)

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SOUTH END -- A procession of people holding flags, each representing a different country, made its way up the center aisle of the Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Oct. 23, at the start of the Mass of World Mission Sunday.

Organized by the Propagation of the Faith, World Mission Sunday is celebrated yearly and serves as a way to honor different cultures from around the world as well as the work of missionaries around the world.

This year, in celebration of the recent canonization of St. Teresa of Calcutta, a relic of the saint, a vial of her blood, was present during the Mass. Attendees were able to venerate it following the liturgy.

Msgr. William Fay, the newly appointed director of the Pontifical Mission Societies for the Archdiocese of Boston, which include the archdiocesan office of the Propagation of the Faith, acted as the principal celebrant and homilist for the Mass.

In his homily, Msgr. Fay spoke on the importance of prayer, and highlighted three "rules of prayer."

The first rule of prayer is the "rule that we've got to have faith when we begin our prayer," said Msgr. Fay.

He clarified that that means we should pray fully expecting God to help us, and said St. Teresa lived her life with that expectation.

"She knew that God was alive and real, even though, mysteriously in her own life, she didn't feel that presence as much as she saw it at work in the lives of others," he said.

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