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New Supreme Court justice says he's humbled by call to serve high court


  • U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts, right, administers the constitutional oath to Judge Neil Gorsuch as his wife, Louise, holds the Bible during an April 10 private ceremony at the Supreme Court in Washington. It was the first of two oaths he was taking to be sworn in as the newest Supreme Court justice. (CNS photo/U.S. Supreme Court via Reuters)
  • The U.S. Supreme Court in Washington is seen April 5. Judge Neil Gorsuch, confirmed for the high court April 7, was sworn in April 10. A constitutional oath was administered first in a morning private ceremony at the court, then a public oath was to take place later in the day in the White House Rose Garden. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)
  • The U.S. Supreme Court in Washington is seen April 5. Judge Neil Gorsuch, confirmed for the high court April 7, was sworn in April 10. A constitutional oath was administered first in a morning private ceremony at the court, then a public oath was to take place later in the day in the White House Rose Garden. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)

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WASHINGTON (CNS) -- After he was sworn in for the U.S. Supreme Court in a public ceremony at the White House Rose Garden April 10, Justice Neil Gorsuch said he would be "a faithful servant of the Constitution" and of the laws "of this great nation."

Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, for whom Gorsuch once clerked, administered the oath to the court's 113th justice. At 49, the former federal appeals court judge from Colorado is the youngest justice to serve on the court in 25 years.

Earlier in the day, Chief Justice John Roberts administered the constitutional oath in a private ceremony inside the Justices' Conference Room at the court.

President Donald Trump praised, saying Gorsuch "will go down in history as one of the truly great justices in the history of the U.S." He said his now-confirmed nominee to the court will render his judgments "not on his personal preferences but based on a fair and objective reading of the law."

Gorsuch, who also clerked for the late Justice Byron White, a fellow Coloradan, fills the seat left vacant by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia last year.

In his remarks in the Rose Garden, Gorsuch said he felt humbled by being called to serve on the nation's highest court and he told his former law clerks he was grateful for their service. "Your names are etched in my heart forever," he remarked.

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