Home » Nation »  Pro-life groups set to travel long distances for annual March for Life

Pro-life groups set to travel long distances for annual March for Life


  • Parishioners from Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church in Takoma Park, Md., march during the March for Life in Washington Jan. 22, 2016. This year's march is set for Jan. 27, starting near the Washington Monument. (CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, Catholic Standard)
  • Pro-life advocates walk past the Supreme Court building during the March for Life in Washington Jan. 22, 2016. This year's march is set for Jan. 27, starting near the Washington Monument. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)
  • Sister Maria Carlota de la Santa Cruz from Nicaragua makes a snow angel outside Immaculate Conception Church in Washington Jan. 24, 2016. She traveled to Washington with a church group from Miami for the March for Life. This year's march is set for Jan. 27, starting near the Washington Monument. (CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, Catholic Standard)

Help us expand our reach! Please share this article

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Participants in the annual March for Life always have two identical memories: the brisk January chill on the streets of the nation's capital, and the long bus ride.

For some, such as the 600 marchers affiliated with the University of Mary in Bismarck, North Dakota, the march will be a culmination of successful organizing and youthful enthusiasm in addition to substantial outside donations. Other groups though, struggle with raising money for just a single busload of about 50.

Pro-life groups and Catholic parishes have organized the bus journeys for most of the of the 44 years of the march, which marks the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade that legalized abortion virtually on demand.

This year's rally Jan. 27 on the Washington Monument grounds followed by a march up Constitution Avenue to the U.S. Supreme Court will be the first for St. Clair County Right to Life in Fort Gratiot, Michigan.

"We hope for a full bus, which would be 55 people, but are expecting about 45," said Roger Thomas, the organization's treasurer. "This is the first year we've actually run the bus, so we're still learning. A party from a neighboring county has been running a bus every January for years, and that seems to be the way it works, at least here in Michigan. Parishes, Knights of Columbus councils, right-to-life groups and such will sponsor the buses and word gets around that the bus is going, so it fills up."

Help us expand our reach! Please share this article

Submit a Letter to the Editor


Comment

Comments Policy